I know I told you that we’d meet the other Wissmanns today but I’m not feeling one with the words tonight so I’m giving you a short post that’s related to one of those other Wissmanns – the other Ludwig to be exact.  But first…

My boss is fond of saying that every box at the National Archives contains a story.  And it’s true – some of them are pretty boring but some of them are pretty exciting.  I, on the other hand, am fond of pointing out that you never know who you’ll meet in the records.  One day I’ll tell you about the day I ran into Lizzie Borden.  And boy did she have an ax to grind.

My favorite box – make that file – in the whole entire National Archives is a great example of people I never expected to meet when I opened the folder.  At first, I just thought I was going to find a letter written by the U.S. Marshall in Arizona about pesky cowboys and disturbances at a little place called Tombstone and some guys named Earp who helped to restore order.  I expected that – it was the whole reason I was in the file in the first place.  But then I ran into General Sherman – that General Sherman – who sent a lengthy telegram complaining about cowboys – everybody hated on cowboys back in the day.  Last but not least, I met a grocer in Prescott, Arizona named Morris Goldwater who wrote a letter about a lawsuit he was involved in.  Morris’ nephew Barry would eventually become the most famous Goldwater Republican ever.

You just never know who you’ll meet – or run into – in the records. 

That’s what happened when I was looking at the manifest for the ship that brought the other Ludwig Wissmann to America in 1923.  Ludwig’s on Line 24.  But it was Line 7 that caught my eye. 

Did I run into someone else I knew in the records?  
Picture
CLICK FOR LARGER IMAGE. Image via ancestry.com via NARA
 


Comments

Terry Fine
02/27/2013 10:11pm

Mom, Bill or Stephen could probably answer this with more details, but the Knuttel's knew the Wissman's. I believe my grandfather Paul Knuttel visited nanny's house on several occasions.

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02/27/2013 11:25pm

Denise, is line 24 the last line on that page? If not, line 25 should have the name of Joseph Wissman. He was Ludwig's brother. And, yes, Ludwig (Louie as we knew him) and his brother came over with Paul Knuttel, my father-in-law. All the "boys" went to Northest High School to learn English. After that, that lost track of each other and didn't meet again till our wedding reception. The all looked at each other and said "I know you!!" And it's true what Terry commented, Paul Knuttel was in Grandmas Wissman"s house when Anna was about 16. Isn't it a small world.?

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Denise
02/28/2013 2:13pm

Line 24 is not the last line but Joseph isn't on that line. I couldn't fine him on this manifest. I was only able to locate him on the manifest of the Reliance that arrived in April 1923. That really is a small world! I like stories like this!

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02/28/2013 6:54pm

Joe and Louie are in that picture of Great grandma, nanny, uncle Al & uncle Freddy. There is one place that I cut them off so the picture would fit what I was doing, but I think you have a copy of the original photo.

02/28/2013 6:55pm

Joe and Louie are in that picture of Greatgrandma, nanny, uncle Al & uncle Freddy. There is one place that I cut them off so the picture would fit what I was doing, but I think you have a copy of the original photo.

02/28/2013 7:10pm

Speaking of coincidences, there is another connection from my mother-in-law and the Wissmans. The wife of Mrs. K's cousin, John Sigmund (Katie) went to school with Nanny at St. Peter's Cathedral, 5th and Girard Ave. I don't remember the circumstances, but they weren't in the same grade, but did know each other slightly.
Did you know that Nanny quite school in the middle of 8th grade. She got a really good mark in Arithmetic, so she figured she would quite while she was ahead. LOL!! She went to a Continuation School and got a job in a Chamois factory. Nanny used to tell us that her and the other girls would put "love" notes in the chamois's when they packaged them. There is a story that she told about cutting the chamois's, if you can picture it. Most of them would have their tongues out the side of their mouths and they chomped down on their tongues as they worked the scissors. We would laugh hysterically when she showed us how they did it.
OK, that's it for now

10/11/2016 8:33am

Wow, thank you for this info. Did you get it off the National Archive? But either way this was a very informative read, so thanks!

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07/28/2017 11:48am

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